Dental 360° – Nevada September Issue

Dental 360° – Nevada September Issue

Welcome to autumn! In this September issue of Dental 360°, discover what xerostomia is and how you can fix it before it becomes a big problem, find out how to prevent gum disease, and meet Dr. Alice Chen, Roseman’s new pediatric dentist.

Roseman Dental & Orthodontics’ Dental 360° is a monthly e-newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a panoramic view of dental health. Dental health is key to your overall health and here at Roseman Dental & Orthodontics, we are dedicated to improving not only your mouth, but your whole self. At our clinic we have an excellent team of licensed dentists, orthodontists, orthodontic residents – 30 to be exact, and dental residents all focused on you and your family’s oral health. Roseman Dental & Orthodontics has been serving its community since 2009 and is a comprehensive, one-stop shop for all your dental needs including dental, orthodontic and craniofacial cleft lip & palate treatment.

We hope you find Dental 360° helpful and informative. We look forward to connecting with you each month.

Dental 360° September Articles

Xerostomia: Causes and Treatments for Dry Mouth
Periodontal Disease and How to Prevent It
Meet Dr. Alice Chen
Back to School! Keeping Kids Healthy In and Out of the Classroom

 

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Meet Dr. Alice Chen

Meet Dr. Alice Chen

Dr. Chen recently joined Roseman’s College of Dental Medicine as a board-certified Pediatric Dentist at Roseman’s clinics in Henderson and Summerlin, NV.  With a warm smile, kind face and gentle way about her, it is immediately obvious that she has a gift for connecting with children.  Dr. Chen knew from a young age that she wanted to be a healthcare provider and that she wanted to use her hands in her profession. Shadowing an optometrist and dentist in high school, she connected quickly with the practice of dentistry but she had no particular plans or interest in treating children. Though Dr. Chen is the eldest of two girls in her family, she did not have a great deal of experience with or an affinity towards children, yet she found that her passion for pediatric dentistry grew while in her second year of dental school in Boston.  She received her dental degree from Boston University and her specialty training in Pediatric Dentistry at Temple University. Originally from California, Dr. Chen received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from UCLA with an emphasis in Developmental Psychology. In dental school, Dr. Chen worked alongside caring, compassionate faculty who took a great interest in mentoring her. Through this, she realized how important it was her to not only to provide preventative care, but to also ease pain and discomfort. Dr. Chen was born to parents who guided her not to a specific profession or interest, but toward an ethos, “be helpful and to take care of others.” She has most certainly followed this guidance in her professional life.

After a decade in private practice, in 2021, Dr. Chen made a personal decision to focus more time on the practice of pediatric dentistry and to let go of some of the administrative and business tasks associated with running a practice. When the opportunity arose at Roseman Dental & Orthodontics, it seemed like a perfect fit. “The opportunity at Roseman gave me the chance to place greater focus on doing what I love most—treating children. I couldn’t be happier about the opportunity to work in both of Roseman’s clinics.   The entrée into academia also offered her the chance to return some of the goodwill and guidance offered to her by faculty when she was a student. In her new role, Dr. Chen has the chance to shape and inspire future providers.

Roseman Dental & Orthodontics, in addition to providing care to adults and children, is the home of the Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) residency, which hosts 2 residents per year through a partnership with NYU Lutheran Dental Medicine. These dentists receive advanced training through Roseman Dental & Orthodontics and are exposed to more complex cases. In her position, Dr. Chen is able to work alongside these residents, shaping their experiences and developing patient-centered practitioners while treating children.  Roseman Dental & Orthodontics’ dental clinic also refers patients to Roseman Dental & Orthodontics’ ortho clinic, which is at the same address and next door.

Dr. Chen also practices at Roseman’s newest dental family member, Roseman Dental – Summerlin, Roseman’s pediatric dental clinic focused exclusively on treating medically compromised children in need of specialized dental care. Dr. Chen works alongside Dr. Michael Cottam, Clinic Director, to treat patients of Roseman’s partner organization, Cure 4 The Kids (C4K). C4K treats children with cancers, blood diseases and other life-threatening diseases. These children often put their dental needs aside, yet they need a dental home with dentists that work alongside their physicians to deliver what is often specialized care.

Dr. Chen is a beloved healthcare provider in the Nevada community. She brings to Roseman extensive experience, a deep commitment to improving the welfare and health of children, and a warm sense of optimism about her work. Dr. Chen and her husband Dr. Matthew Raddue, an anesthesiologist, enjoy being parents to their two children. Welcome Dr. Chen!

Xerostomia: Causes and Treatments for Dry Mouth

Xerostomia: Causes and Treatments for Dry Mouth

Xerostomia is a big word with a simple definition: dry mouth. It’s the term for the absence of saliva in the mouth that can cause discomfort, often leading patients to seek medical treatment. The condition isn’t a disease in itself, but is actually caused by other factors.

While everyone experiences a dry mouth at one time or another, chronic dry mouth can not only be frustrating, but can also cause medical and dental issues. Treating xerostomia is important to improve overall quality of life as well as preventing any additional problems.

What Causes Xerostomia?

Many different issues can cause dry mouth. Some of the causes for this common condition include:

  • Medications. Many over-the-counter and prescription drugs list dry mouth as a side effect.
  • Nerve damage. Damage to the nerves that control saliva production can result in xerostomia.
  • Cancer treatments. Chemotherapy drugs or radiation can halt the production of saliva.
  • Other diseases. Parkinson’s or Sjogren’s syndrome can affect the salivary gland.

Other conditions, including stress and depression, can lead to a lower production of saliva as well.

What Problems does Xerostomia Cause?

Leaving xerostomia untreated can lead to further issues. The condition can cause difficulties with speech and eating, as well as an increase in cavities or infections in the mouth, since salvia helps wash away bacteria from the surface of the teeth.

What is the Treatment for Xerostomia?

To begin treatment for xerostomia, its root cause must be discovered. Eliminating the cause isn’t always possible, so dental professionals will find a treatment option that addresses the issue while not detracting from other medical care.

Some remedies can treat dry mouth, but they won’t cure it. These options include avoiding alcohol-based mouthwashes, using artificial saliva, sipping plain water, or using over-the-counter dry mouth products. Prescription medications can be used to stimulate saliva production in order to replace the saliva and prevent other medical and dental issues.

Dry mouth should be treated not only because of the discomfort it causes, but also because of the serious issues it can cause. Prioritize good oral care and regular dental treatments to prevent further problems. If you’re in need of dental care, make an appointment with Roseman Dental to get help from one of our empathic, patient-focused providers.

Periodontal Disease and How to Prevent It

Periodontal Disease and How to Prevent It

Periodontal disease occurs when the plaque that adheres to the teeth is not effectively removed. Plaque forms when bacteria in the mouth combine with mucus, creating a sticky and damaging substance that attaches to the teeth. Brushing and flossing regularly does certainly help minimize the formation of plaque, but any plaque that remains often turns into something called tartar, which cannot be easily brushed or flossed away at home. This is just one reason regular dentist visits are so essential!

To reduce the chances of developing gum disease, it’s important to recognize risk factors. Here’s a look at some of the things that commonly lead to gum disease and ways to prevent them from getting that far:

Genetic Makeup

Each person’s genetics play an important role in determining how healthy their teeth and gums are. So much so, in fact, that some researchers believe that as much as 30% of the population is especially susceptible to gum disease. However, even those who are predisposed to the issue can dramatically reduce their chances of developing it simply by engaging in strong oral hygiene practices. In this case of nature vs. nurture, go for nurture.

Stress Levels

While stress in and of itself isn’t a direct contributor to periodontal disease, it has a tendency to weaken the overall immune system. This means that fighting off infections will be tougher in general. In other words, if you’re in the beginning stages of gum disease and are particularly stressed out, it will likely exacerbate the problem. Talk to a doctor if you need help managing stress and its affects.

Smoking Habits

If someone doesn’t already suffer from periodontal disease, smoking may cause it to develop. If someone is a smoker and already has symptoms of gum disease, continuing the habit will only make the problem worse. The more someone smokes, the greater their risk, so cutting down an existing habit (or better yet, quitting entirely) can pay off in the form of improved oral health.

There are many risk factors associated with periodontal disease. The easiest and most effective ways of reducing the chance of developing it is to practice strong brushing and flossing habits, and visit the dentist at regular intervals. If your next appointment isn’t on the calendar yet, make one with Roseman Dental to keep those gums and teeth healthy.

Dental 360° – Nevada June Issue

Dental 360° – Nevada June Issue

Summer is here! In this June issue of Dental 360°, you’ll discover how the Brius lingual bracket system makes getting a straighter smile easier than ever, learn about all the ways dental health is connected to overall health, and find out which summer treats could be hurting your teeth. Plus, you’ll learn about food allergies from our friends at Roseman Medical Group.

Roseman Dental & Orthodontics’ Dental 360° is a monthly e-newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a panoramic view of dental health. Dental health is key to your overall health and here at Roseman Dental & Orthodontics, we are dedicated to improving not only your mouth, but your whole self. At our clinic we have an excellent team of licensed dentists, orthodontists, orthodontic residents – 30 to be exact, and dental residents all focused on you and your family’s oral health. Roseman Dental & Orthodontics has been serving its community since 2009 and is a comprehensive, one-stop shop for all your dental needs including dental, orthodontic and craniofacial cleft lip & palate treatment.

We hope you find Dental 360° helpful and informative. We look forward to connecting with you each month.

 

Dental 360° June Articles

Revolutionizing Orthodontics Through Lingual Braces – Brius
Healthy Mouth = Healthy Body
Summer Treats That Are Bad for Your Teeth
Food Allergies

 

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Summer Treats That Are Bad for Your Teeth

Summer Treats That Are Bad for Your Teeth

Now that hot weather is here, the time is right for barbecues, swimming, and cooling off with some warm weather treats. Popsicles, smoothies, and other sugary confections are fun parts of long summer days. Unfortunately, these treats can quickly do the teeth more harm than good, especially if you aren’t being careful about keeping up with proper oral care. Here are a few summer treats to skip, and some better options to consider.

Popsicles and Shaved Ice

Before you grab that flavored popsicle or head to the local shaved ice shack, it’s important to understand how these chilly snacks could be harmful to the teeth. Both are often loaded with sugars, whether through-and-through or covered in sugary syrup. This sugar eats away at the outer layer of tooth enamel, encourages bacteria growth, and can easily lead to cavities. In addition, biting or chewing on icy things could lead to chipped teeth to severe pain from cold sensitivity.

There are plenty of cold sweet treats that wreak less havoc on the teeth. Reach for a bowl of fresh fruit straight out of the refrigerator, which can help satisfy your craving for something sweet with a little natural sugar, and the cold will help satisfy your craving for something cool on a hot summer day.

Ice Cream

What’s more fun than going to the ice cream shop on a warm summer day? Like popsicles and shaved ice, ice cream is also loaded with sugar and can cause sensitivity and pain from both the sugar and cold temperatures. People in the U.S. already consume two to three times the amount of sugar recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA)—kids consume on average 32 teaspoons (tsp) per day, adults consume 22 tsp, and the AHA recommends no more than 9.5 tsp, so adding a daily ice cream treat might be increasing sugar intake to potentially harmful levels.

Instead, try buying sugar-free or low-sugar ice cream, and skip the toppings like caramel or syrup. If you do indulge a little in ice cream, try to eat it immediately following a regular meal, since the extra saliva in your mouth can help rinse the sugar from your teeth. Another smart choice is to brush your teeth within about 10 minutes to remove any lingering sugar.

Sodas and Sports Drinks

In the warm weather months, many kids and adults participate in sports teams and outdoor activities. Sports drinks can seem like the obvious choice after a long workout or intense game to help rehydrate, but keep in mind that these drinks can be full of sugar. They’re especially rough on the teeth straight from the bottle because the liquid comes in direct contact with the teeth. Many sodas also have the added problem of high acid levels that eat away at tooth enamel.

Instead of sugary sports drinks and sodas, reach for water to quench that thirst. If you do decide to drink a soda or a sports drink, drink through a straw to limit tooth exposure as much as possible. Also try to drink soda only during meal times, rather than sipping on it throughout the day and extending the time your teeth are exposed.

What to Feed Kids

Without the structure of a school day, kids might be spending a lot more time snacking throughout the day. To keep the sugar intake at a minimum, have some healthy snacks ready:

  • Protein-filled snacks like nuts, cheese, and turkey
  • Vegetables like celery and carrot sticks
  • Fruits like apple or orange slices, bananas, berries, and grapes
  • Plenty of cold water—add some fresh lemons, limes, mint, or cucumbers to the water to enhance the flavor

For more tips about teeth-friendly snacking, talk to a dentist today. If you don’t have a dentist, make an appointment with Roseman Dental for affordable and patient-centered dental care.