Dental 360° – Utah April Issue

Dental 360° – Utah April Issue

It’s a new month and Spring has finally arrived. The time has come where we can start enjoying the warmer weather, the beautiful flowers beginning to bloom, and the great outdoors. April is a month to be appreciative of the world around us, but it is also a time to bring awareness to Parkinson’s Disease and Oral Cancer. April is Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Awareness Month. PD is a nervous system disorder that affects movement. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year and over 10 million people worldwide are living with it. Join Roseman Dental and the Parkinson’s Foundation this month to #KnowMorePD. This month is also Oral Cancer Awareness Month. Oral Cancer is cancer of the mouth and upper throat. Every hour, 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year, someone dies of oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Yet, with early detection and treatment, Oral Cancer has high rates of survival. Make sure to get screened for Oral Cancer at your next dentist appointment.

During this month’s issue of Dental 360°, you’ll gain insight into how Parkinson’s Disease impacts dental health (link to article), a 360° look at Oral Cancer and gain a better understanding of tooth sensitivity and why you may have it (link to article).

Roseman Dental’s Dental 360° is a monthly e-newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a panoramic view of dental health. Dental health is key to your overall health and here at Roseman Dental, we are dedicated to improving not only your mouth, but your whole self. At our clinic we have an excellent team of licensed dentists, dental residents and students, and dental assistants and hygienists all focused on you and your family’s oral health. We offer comprehensive care, are a one stop shop for all your dental needs and offer dental care at a cost typically lower than what you would find at a traditional dental office. Roseman Dental has been serving its community since 2011 and we look forward to continuing to serve you and your family.

We hope you find Dental 360° helpful and informative. We look forward to connecting with you monthly.

 

Dental 360° April Articles

Parkinson’s Disease & Dental Health
Oral Cancer Awareness
Tooth Sensitivity & Why I Have It

Tooth Sensitivity & Why I Have It

Tooth Sensitivity & Why I Have It

Do you ever feel pain when you consume certain foods or drinks that are hot, cold, sweet or acidic? You may be suffering from tooth sensitivity, also known as dentine hypersensitivity (DH) or dentine sensitivity (DS). Tooth sensitivity is defined as pain or discomfort in the teeth as a response to certain triggers or stimuli, such as hot or cold temperatures. Sensitivity occurs when tooth enamel is thinned.

Tooth Enamel

Tooth enamel is the visible, outermost covering of your teeth. The color of healthy enamel varies from light yellow to a gray or blue-like white. It’s the hardest substance in the human body and contains a high percentage of minerals. It protects the inner, more fragile areas of your teeth known as pulp and dentin. Taking care of your enamel is very important because it is the first line of defense against tooth sensitivity and tooth decay – the most common dental condition worldwide.

How Tooth Enamel is Worn Down

Tooth enamel can be worn down by brushing your teeth too hard, using a hard toothbrush, grinding your teeth at night – also known as sleep or nocturnal bruxism – and regularly eating or drinking acidic foods and beverages. It can also be worn down from repeated exposure to extreme temperatures.

Treating Tooth Sensitivity at Home

If you are experiencing tooth sensitivity, there are some things you can try that are considered over-the-counter dental treatments, but it is always important to consult with your dentist about your teeth sensitivity as they have the most knowledge and expertise in this area.

Desensitizing Toothpaste

Select a toothpaste that’s labeled as being specifically made for sensitive teeth. These types of toothpaste won’t have irritating ingredients. Some of these types of toothpastes also can contain desensitizing ingredients that can assist in blocking the discomfort from traveling to the nerve of the tooth. If you’re not sure what desensitizing toothpaste is right for you, consult with your dentist.

Alcohol-free Mouthwash

Mouthwash that does not contain alcohol will be less irritating to sensitive teeth.

Soft Toothbrushes & Brushing Softer

Tooth enamel can be worn down by brushing too hard and using a hard-bristled toothbrush. Try brushing softer and using a soft-bristled toothbrush or electric toothbrush.

Treating Tooth Sensitivity at the Dentist

If the at-home remedies just aren’t working, make sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist. There are a variety of things they can do to assist with tooth sensitivity.

Fluoride

Your dentist might apply fluoride to the sensitive areas of your teeth to strengthen tooth enamel and reduce pain. Your dentist might also suggest the use of prescription fluoride at home, applied via a custom tray.

Desensitizing or Bonding

Occasionally, exposed root surfaces can be treated by applying bonding resin to the sensitive root surfaces. A local anesthetic might be needed.

Surgical Gum Graft

Gum graft, also known as gingival graft, can be performed when your gums are receding. Gum recession exposes the roots of your teeth and can cause sensitivity and lead to tooth decay. If your tooth root has lost gum tissue, a small amount of gum tissue can be taken from elsewhere in your mouth and attached to the affected site. This can protect exposed roots and reduce sensitivity.

Root Canal

If your sensitive teeth cause severe pain and other treatments aren’t effective, your dentist might recommend a root canal — an endodontic treatment used to treat problems inside the tooth, known as the soft core or dental pulp. While this might seem like a significant treatment, it’s considered the most successful technique for eliminating tooth sensitivity.

If you’re experiencing teeth sensitivity schedule an appointment with Roseman Dental. Our skilled team will examine the affected teeth and recommend treatment to reduce your sensitivity.

Nevada Location
Utah Location

 

Dental 360° – Nevada April Issue

Dental 360° – Nevada April Issue

It’s a new month and Spring has finally arrived. The time has come where we can start enjoying the warmer weather, the beautiful flowers beginning to bloom, and the great outdoors. April is a month to be appreciative of the world around us, but it is also a time to bring awareness to Parkinson’s Disease and Oral Cancer. April is Parkinson’s Disease (PD) Awareness Month. PD is a nervous system disorder that affects movement. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year and over 10 million people worldwide are living with it. Join Roseman Dental & Orthodontics and the Parkinson’s Foundation this month to #KnowMorePD. This month is also Oral Cancer Awareness Month. Oral Cancer is cancer of the mouth and upper throat. Every hour, 24-hours-a-day, 365-days-a-year, someone dies of oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Yet, with early detection and treatment, Oral Cancer has high rates of survival. Make sure to get screened for Oral Cancer at your next dentist appointment.

During this month’s issue of Dental 360°, you’ll gain insight into how Parkinson’s Disease impacts dental health, a 360° look at Oral Cancer and the spring discounts Roseman Dental is offering for orthodontic treatment.

Roseman Dental & Orthodontics’ Dental 360° is a monthly e-newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a panoramic view of dental health. Dental health is key to your overall health and here at Roseman Dental & Orthodontics, we are dedicated to improving not only your mouth, but your whole self. At our clinic we have an excellent team of licensed dentists, orthodontists, orthodontic residents – 30 to be exact, and dental residents all focused on you and your family’s oral health. Roseman Dental & Orthodontics has been serving its community since 2009 and is a comprehensive, one stop shop for all your dental needs including dental, orthodontic and craniofacial cleft lip & palate treatment.

We hope you find Dental 360° helpful and informative. We look forward to connecting with you monthly.

 

Dental 360° April Articles

Parkinson’s Disease & Dental Health
Oral Cancer Awareness
Spring into a Fresh Smile – New Orthodontic Discounts

 

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Parkinson’s Disease & Dental Health

Parkinson’s Disease & Dental Health

Parkinson’s Disease, also known as PD, is a nervous system disorder that affects movement. PD is considered a diverse disorder that develops slowly over time and is different for everyone – no two people experience PD in the same way. Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with PD each year and over 10 million people worldwide are living with it.

Although PD is a nervous system disorder, it complicates oral health for those diagnosed with this disease. PD’s movement symptoms can interfere with an individual’s ability to maintain oral hygiene because PD affects the health of the mouth, teeth, and jaw.

Parkinson’s Disease Dental Issues

Rigidity, Tremors, Dyskinesia, Fatigue & Anxiety

Rigidity, tremors and dyskinesia symptoms related to PD can make it very challenging to brush your teeth. These symptoms of PD have also been known to cause cracked teeth, tooth wear, tooth grinding and denture issues. Fatigue, anxiety and tremors symptoms related to PD can make traveling to the dentist, sitting still in the dentist’s chair, or opening your mouth wide for the dentist very challenging.

Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

Dental caries, also known as tooth decay, is damage to a tooth that can happen when decay-causing bacteria in your mouth make acids that attack the tooth’s surface, or enamel. This can lead to a small hole in a tooth, called a cavity.

Periodontal Disease (Periodontitis or Gum Disease)

Periodontal disease, also known as periodontitis or gum disease, begins with bacterial growth in your mouth and may end with tooth loss due to destruction of the tissue that surrounds your teeth, if not treated properly.

Sialorrhea (Drooling or Excessive Salivation)

Sialorrhea, also known as drooling or excessive salivation, is mostly caused by poor oral and facial muscle control. Contributing factors may include hypersecretion of saliva, dental malocclusion, postural problems, and an inability to recognize salivary spill. Sialorrhea causes a range of physical and psychosocial complications, including perioral chapping, dehydration, odor, and social stigmatization, that can be devastating for patients and their families.

Xerostomia (Dry Mouth)

Xerostomia, also known as dry mouth, results from reduced saliva flow. Dry mouth can increase the chance of cavities.

Additional dental health issues that may occur for individuals diagnosed with PD include orofacial pain and burning mouth syndrome, mastication disorders, bruxism, and subjective taste impairment.

Parkinson’s Disease Dental Visit Tips

Going to the dentist when you have PD or taking someone with PD to the dentist can be stressful. The Parkinson’s Foundation has some great tips to make dental visits less stressful for everyone.

  • Call first to make the office aware of your PD symptoms. This will help the dentist and the staff provide better treatment.
  • Schedule wisely. Plan short dental appointments for the time of day your symptoms are most effectively controlled.
  • Give the dentist the details of your overall health. Someone on staff should record vital signs upon arrival.
  • Tell the dentist if you are taking MAO-B inhibitors (rasagiline and selegiline), as these may interact with anesthetics.
  • Consider replacing old fillings, crowns and bridges, and ill-fitting dentures or mouth guards during the early stages of PD. Dental visits may become more difficult as PD progresses.

Maintaining Good Dental Health with Parkinson’s Disease

It is very important to maintain good dental health when diagnosed with PD. As the disease progresses, it is often up to the caregiver or family member to take the responsibility of oral hygiene because the individual with advanced PD can no longer perform adequate oral self-care. Start now and make it a habit to visit the dentist regularly (every six months). Schedule an appointment today with Roseman Dental.

Nevada Location
Utah Location

Treating Parkinson’s Disease at Roseman Medical Group (Nevada Based)

At Roseman Medical Group (RMG), the Nevada based clinical practice of Roseman University’s College of Medicine, has expert neurologist, Eric Farbman M.D., dedicated to treating Parkinson’s Disease and a variety of other neurological disorders. Roseman University is a site for the Parkinson Study Group and currently has studies for patients with many different degrees of Parkinson’s Disease, from newly diagnosed to advanced. The University is waiting to start a study for multiple system atrophy, an atypical Parkinson-plus disorder with no current treatments, as well as an essential tremor study.

RMG also performs more aggressive treatments for Parkinson’s Disease. Dr. Farbman currently manages over 200 deep brain stimulator (DBS) patients for a variety of medical conditions including Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor, and dystonia. For those who are unaware of this treatment, it is essentially a pacemaker for the brain. This treatment can be particularly helpful for involuntary movements and dystonia, especially when maximal oral medical treatment has been provided. There is now a levodopa pump that can be prescribed for Parkinson’s Disease patients as well, and botulinum toxin injection has been a longstanding therapy for dystonia.

The neurologists at RMG provide empathic, patient-centered, evidence-based care. If you have a friend or family member who suffers from Parkinson’s Disease, let RMG’s expert neurologists help! Contact RMG today! If you’d like to learn more about Parkinson’s Disease, click here.